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5 sustainable packaging trends to watch in 2017

Companies have shifted their attention to packaging and are realizing the importance of sustainable packaging.

A lot of waste comes from disposing packaging, most of the waste ends up in landfills. Because of this, sustainable packaging has gained popularity. Companies are looking into ways to incorporate sustainable materials and practices in their packaging to create less of an impact on the planet.

Here are some of the sustainable packaging trends to look for in 2017

  1. Labeling will get clearer – Make it clear on the product packaging how to dispose of the packaging and clarify if there are sustainability claims. Clear labeling will also help your customers to be better informed. Being honest with customers will go a long way.
  2. Lightweight packaging will be embraced– Lightweight packaging has numerous benefits. Less material is needed to produce packages, manufacturing costs are lower, the environmental impact from transport is minimized and less waste is sent to landfills. The only negative is that when the recovery rates increase, it will remove the value from the recycling stream and undermine the economic incentive to recycle.
  3. Increased use of recyclable materials – The easiest way to ensure packaging has the least amount of impact is by using recyclable materials to manufacture the packaging.
  4. Edible packaging – Edible packaging eliminates packaging waste altogether; you would eat the packaging the product came in. Some of the challenges include: logistical problems like the risk of the packaging material being broken or consumer’s impressions that the packaging is unhygienic.
  5. Packages will slim down – The extra space within the package is creating additional material that needs to be disposed of. The goal is minimal packaging.

 

Full article: http://www.beveragedaily.com/Processing-Packaging/5-sustainable-packaging-trends-to-watch-in-2017

Source: Beverage Daily

How supply chains affect packaging

Michael Kuebler, technical director of North America distribution testing at Smithers Pira in Lansing, MI., guides a team of packaging experts who analyze the true impact of the supply chain on a given package.

How should companies weigh performance, cost and sustainability initiatives? Is one more important than the others?

Companies should take a total cost view when evaluating materials, sustainability goals and performance by leveraging high quality predictive tools.  We often see that various operations within a company are functioning in silos with one group focused on cost reduction, another focused on reducing damage and another focused on sustainability objectives. A decision by one group can affect all the others and can also cause an increase in damage rates and non-saleables.

Material reduction savings are quickly lost when the material’s performance is sacrificed beyond what is required to get the products to the consumers in good condition.  Nothing is more costly than shipping a product twice.

In turn, sustainability gains from new packaging materials or packaging material reductions can be quickly lost if the packaging’s performance is reduced past what is required to get the products to the consumers.  Sustainability goals should encompass all inputs, including fuel costs, handling, etc., used to get a product to the consumer.

In order to truly optimize packaging performance, various business functions need to understand the cost implications across the full supply chain, which can be achieved through distribution testing.

 

Full article: http://www.foodengineeringmag.com/articles/96232-how-supply-chains-affect-packaging

Source: Food Engineering

Sustainable packaging requires yin and yang thinking

Sustainable Materials Management and The Circular Economy are two big picture catch phrases competing for the attention of the packaging industry. Do you know which is better for the environment and which is better for your bottom line?

Sustainable Materials Management (SMM) is a framework for minimizing the environmental impacts related to the consumption of products and services. It is based on the concept of lifecycle thinking, whereby the cradle-to-grave chain of inputs, throughputs and outputs of a specific product or service is measured, analyzed, compared and evaluated.

There are two primary aspects to SMM. The first relates to source reduction; the goal is to minimize the amount of materials and energy needed to deliver 100% of the value expected from purchased products and services.

After source reduction techniques are applied, the key to successful SMM implementation is to:

• Use only the most effective, efficient material and energy resources when creating products and services, and

• Keep those resources operating indefinitely within the economic system.

Doing so requires Circular Economy (CE) thinking, which minimizes disposability and waste while maximizing conservation, reuse and recovery.

When working within both SMM and CE frameworks, it is important to keep a couple of points in mind:

1. Looking at the “big picture” from a lifecycle perspective can produce counter-intuitive, but more effective, actions and results.

2. Because we haven’t yet invented a perpetual-motion machine, achieving SMM and CE is a journey, not a destination. Over time, innovation and its long-term effects can create the need to augment or modify strategies and tactics.

To read the full article, click here:
http://www.packagingdigest.com/sustainable-packaging/sustainable-packaging-requires-yin-yang-thinking1608

Source: Packaging Digest

The outlook for the green packaging market to 2020

Global Green Packaging Market 2016-2020, from Infiniti Research conducted a new study predicting the global green packaging market will experience growth at a CAGR of more than 7% during the forecasted period. With the consumer demand for eco-friendly and sustainable packaging material on the rise, vendors are focused on developing materials that have the traditional qualities but can also be recycled.

Europe leads the market with more than 31% in 2015; the rest of the world is well diversified as well. The leading countries in this region are Germany, United Kingdom and Italy.

According to the report, one of the major drivers of the market is the demand for bioplastics. Bioplastics are considered more sustainable than conventional plastic packaging products because they consume less energy and natural resources during the manufacturing process, generate lower CO2 emissions, and are lightweight by nature.

Click here to read the full article: http://www.packworld.com/sustainability/bioplastics/outlook-green-packaging-market-2020

Source: Packaging World

Package Sustainability Now an Expectation

Smithers Pira’s report, “Ten-year Forecast of Disruptive Technologies in Sustainable Packaging to 2026,” says, “Sustainability will become an increasingly important factor for decision makers at all stages of packaging value chains. Sustainability is now a fast-growing and vitally important area of concern for packaging and addresses economic, environmental and social objectives.”

“The trend toward sustainability is an important influence on the packaging industry. Consumers, manufacturers and retailers are all demanding more sustainable systems, which are formalized in corporate social responsibility goals and publicized in product marketing,” says Dr Terence A. Cooper, author of the report.

“Consequently, sustainability is no longer just nice to have, but is now seen as a necessity for attracting consumers and protecting market share – i.e. it is now an expectation, not a differentiator.”

Smithers Pira’s report makes the following points:

• Mechanical recycling and sustainability are not synonymous and many different factors contribute to the carbon footprints of different packaging types and materials.

• The most important rigid packaging plastic is PET, followed by polyethylene (PE); PET and PE combined account for about 65% of plastics used for rigid packaging. Polypropylene is next. In contrast, the most important plastic material used for flexible packaging is PE, followed by PP and PET.

• There is presently no package that is completely sustainable and the various packaging materials (including plastics, paper, paperboard, metals and glass) all have advantages and shortcomings depending upon the product application.

To read the entire article, click here: http://www.healthcarepackaging.com/sustainability/strategy/package-sustainability-now-expectation

Source: Healthcare Packaging

Sustainable Packaging in the Cosmetic and Personal Care Industry

The cosmetic and personal care industry are embracing and contributing to the innovations that are coming from the sustainable packaging culture. The push for packaging that limits the environmental impact through the use of reuse/recycling/reduction of natural materials. Pangea Organics has been developing innovative packaging that combines creative designs, while minimizing their environmental footprint. The Pangea Organics origami fold box made from WindPower 80 has a goal of zero waste by utilizing Aaron Mickelson’s disappearing package. This package is made with PVOH plastic film that dissolves in water. This is just one of the intriguing packaging designs that highlights the boundless potential of sustainable packaging. The range of materials that can be used to create packaging appears endless. Leslie Sherr, co-author of Material ConnXion, discusses the amount of renewal resources that can be used to create packaging. Sherr highlights the potential for material created using mushrooms. Ecovative, a company that specializes in bioplastics using mycelium offers an alternative to synthetic polymers.

 

There is no shortage of sustainable packaging material; the place to be looking for innovative sustainable packaging is the Sustainable Packaging Coalition. Sherr explains they have an extensive list of members, some of the world’s leading consumer brands. The coalition also offers curriculum services that provide the fundamentals of a system drive approach to packaging and design innovation. The contemporary beauty packaging is setting the standard to sustainable packaging and making good use of renewable resource packaging.

 

To read the full interview, please visit:

http://www.cosmeticsdesign.com/Packaging-Design/Cosmetics-and-Personal-Care-Packaging-sustainable-materials

 

Source: Cosmeticsdesign.com

 

Boundless Potential for Cosmetics Packaging

Sustainability has become an integral part of the beauty business – environmentally intelligent packaging designs are attracting more consumers, satisfy current customers, and create an ethical mission for the company.

A new perspective on a familiar concept: this is the revolution of compostable packaging is providing says design expert, Leslie Sherr, co-author of the latest book series from Material ConneXion. By incorporating compostable bioplastics based on mycelium, or mushrooms, or technotraf wood packaging from that derives from sustainable forests manufacturers and design experts can open up many possibilities. Sherr adds that how materials are treated and applied is where the potential exists; furthermore, working with the same material in a new way holds immense potential.

There is no limit to sustainable packaging, and a good place to start is the Sustainable Packaging Coalition, states Sherr. They have a large database that have an extensive list of consumer brands and they understand design innovation.

To read more from Leslie Sherr, please visit http://www.cosmeticsdesign.com/Packaging-Design/Cosmetics-and-Personal-Care-Packaging-sustainable-materials

Source: Cosmetics Design

Cosmetic packaging: Need for green overhaul?

Cosmetic companies are making slow progress in reducing their packaging footprints. Although the cosmetics industry has become preoccupied with green initiatives, few steps have been made to tackle the environmental impact of packaging.

According to Organic Monitor most developments are occurring in ecodesign, with many companies reducing packaging materials by changing design structures. Most changes in packaging design are only leading to an incremental decrease in packaging materials. In some cases, any ecological benefits from less packaging material are offset by higher unit sales. More radical solutions involving materials are necessary to make significant changes to the packaging impact of cosmetic products.

Few developments are occurring in packaging materials. Even though some cosmetic companies are experimenting with sustainable materials like bamboo and wood, plastic packaging still prevails. High raw material costs and inadequate waste disposal methods give plastic packaging a very high environmental footprint. Plant-based plastics have yet to make headway in cosmetic applications.

To read the entire article, click the link below

http://www.worldpressonline.com/PressRelease/cosmetic-packaging-need-for-green-overhaul-40006.html

Source: Word Press Online