Posts

Plastic Packaging Better for Environment than Alternatives Made with Other Materials

A recent life cycle assessment analyzed the energy and climate benefits of alternative plastic materials in contrast to plastic material. The categories included caps and closures, beverage containers, other rigid containers carrier bags, stretch/shrink wrap, and other flexible packaging materials. Carol Hochu, President and CEO of the Canadian Plastic Industry Association noted, “Plastic packaging enables the safe and efficient delivery of various products which form part of our daily lives, everything from food to essential health and safety aids. However, many are unaware that plastics carry out these functions while at the same time conserving energy and lowering greenhouse gas emissions.”

 

In Canada, the LCA found that replacing all plastic packaging the non-plastic packaging would:

 

  1. Require nearly 4.4 times as much packaging material by weight. Increasing by nearly 5.5 million tons.
  2. This would also increase energy use by 2.0 times. This was calculated as being equivalent to the amount of oil transported by 18 supertankers
  3. This would result in 2.3 times more global warming potential. This was equated to adding 3.3 million more cars to the road.

 

Engineering in plastic packaging enables innovation and performance – the ability to extend the shelf life of foods and medicines. Plastic packaging viewed from the entire life cycle have more benefits than the snapshot that has been taken in years.

 

The afterlife of plastic is further contributing to sustainability in many ways. The ability to recycle, reuse and repurpose for energy value and converted to liquid oil, electricity and into other fuels.

 

There have been great strides made in the reusability and repurposing of plastic containers. These valuable resources are used to make fleece jackets, new plastic bottles, pipes, pallets, creates and buckets, decking and other lawn and garden products. The majority of product stemming from recycled plastic bottles, non-bottle rigid plastics such as deli and dairy containers, bakery, vegetable, fruit containers, and plastic film, bags and outer wrap.

 

Plastic enhances our lifestyles, our economy, and the environment.

 

Source: Canadian Plastics Industry Association

Flexible packaging on exhibit at the IDFA Ice Cream Technology Conference

CDF Corporation, a global company that specializes in the manufacture and sale of high quality pail, drum, intermediate bulk container and bag in box liners and flexible packaging, will display form-fit IBC tote liners at the International Dairy Foods Association Ice Cream Technology Conference.

The International Dairy Foods Association Ice Cream Technology Conference will be held April 8th through the 9th in St. Petersburg, Florida. This event is for ice cream and frozen dessert professionals. It is the only meeting that focuses specifically on frozen dessert research, technology, new market trends, food safety, labeling and opportunities. The Ice Cream Technology Conference encourages an open exchange among participants and experts on the technical and practical processing issues in the frozen dessert industry. The conference features networking opportunities and product tasting, including the annual Innovative Ice Cream Flavor Competition.

Representing CDF will be Leigh Vaughn, Regional Manager. Leigh is responsible for growth of flexible packaging products for industrial containers. Leigh has 23 years of sales management experience in the flexible packaging industry. Combining a deep understanding of packaging, industrial applications and direct customer relationships allows Leigh to offer a consultative approach in these areas.

CDF offers a wide range of flexible products that satisfy customer’s environmental needs. Formfit liners are manufactured to form fit the internal shape of your intermediate bulk container. Form-fit IBC (cube-shaped) liners provide high performance in critical applications, such as top-fill applications using a bridge or automated filler; containers with no access doors for placing a liner at the bottom; high speed fills and viscous products that would get caught in the folds of pillow-shaped liners.

CDF improves the IBC Form-Fit Liner

The CDF engineering team has created a customer benefit by modifying the IBC form-fit liner to include holes in the perforated flaps. These holes were strategically added to help hold the liner in place during filling; by keeping the liner squared, these flaps make fills easier. Once the IBC form-fit liner is filled, the flaps can be detached and used with a winder for dispensing. CDF was the first flexible packaging manufacturer to add holes to the perforated flaps to a number of customized applications. This feature is now part of all of CDF’s stock IBC form-fit liners.

Form-fit IBC liners provide high performance in critical applications, such as top-fill applications using a bridge or automated filler; containers with no access doors for placing a liner at the bottom; high speed fills and viscous products that would get caught in the folds of pillow-shaped liners.

Typical form-fit liner markets include chemicals (adhesives, automotive lubricants, automotive oils, chemicals, coatings, concrete drilling additives, detergents, inks, paints, polymer emulsions); cosmetics (conditioner, cream, lipstick, liquid makeup, lotion, mascara, shampoo); food and beverage (concentrated fruit, edible oils, fish oil, fructose, jams, liquid egg, malts, molasses, pastes, sweeteners, syrups, vinegar, juice, wine); and pharmaceutical.

To learn more about CDF’s IBC Form-Fit Liner contact us at 800.443.1920