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Responsible food packaging could connect consumers to the environment

Research reveals that 80% U.S. food shoppers agree that reducing food waste is as important as reducing packaging waste. According to Mintel’s 2016 US Food Packaging Report 52% of consumers indicate they would prefer to buy foods with minimal or even no packaging to reduce waste.

81% of consumers say they would choose resealable packaging over non-resealable packaging to extend the shelf life of food. 54% would pay more for packaging with added features, such as being resealable or portion controlled. 30% indicated they often reuse food packaging for other purposes. However, recycling of food packaging is far from a universal behavior, as only 42% consumers report recycling most of the food packaging they use.

A lack of clear communication on labels may be a contributor to the relatively low recycling rate, 25% of consumers said it’s not always clear which food packaging is recyclable. Only 13% of consumers make an effort to avoid foods in packaging that cannot be recycled.

“Our research shows that reducing food waste is top of mind for consumers,” says John Owen, senior food and drink analyst at Mintel. “This presents opportunities for food brands and retailers to address these concerns through innovative packaging and product messaging.”

However, in 2015, only 21% of food product launches in the U.S. included on package claims regarding environmentally friendly packaging.

“The prevention of food waste can be positioned not only as a good way for consumers to save money, but also as a way to work toward reversing the growing food waste trend through conscious consumption,” says Owen.

Click here to read the article:
http://www.packagingdigest.com/food-packaging/responsible-food-packaging-could-connect-consumers-to-the-environment-2016-09-01

Source: Packaging Digest

Food packagers prefer recyclable over compostable materials

The latest finding from Packaging Digest’s Sustainable Packaging Study is that recycling is preferred over compostable packaging. In the survey 57% of brand owners and packaging suppliers sited recyclability as the most important environmental claim. Recyclability has the advantage of already having a large infrastructure in place that can collect, sort and sell the recycled materials.

Commercial composting facilities, which are necessary to create composted materials that can be reused, are less available and often require a drive to offload the materials for composting. This additional use of gas negates some of the green benefits of composting. Since only 20% of the total respondents polled selected compostable as important to their environmental claims, compostable might not offer a good return on investment.

To read the full article, go to
http://www.plasticstoday.com/food-packagers-prefer-recyclable-over-compostable-materials/35071181924370

Source: Plastics Today

Why Sustainable Packaging is a must have for Restaurant Success

While the farm-to-table trend continues to grow, consumers are becoming more aware of what goes into the food they purchase and consume. This translates into more demand on restaurants to provide not only transparency in the nutrition label but also the sustainability of their packaging for food products. In a recent survey performed by Asia Pulp & Paper, American consumers want sustainable food packaging labeling to be clear and concise in reflecting the materials they use.

Previously, consumers may have viewed sustainable packaging labels as a nice bit of information. However, sustainability has shifted to a priority for Americans, restaurants, and the entire food industry. Meeting consumer demands is important for business and consumer loyalty. In another survey that focused more on consumer loyalty and likelihood to recommend a brand, 51% of Americans are more likely to recommend a brand if it includes environmental and sustainability related information. Based on consumer attitudes, paired with business, regulatory and environmental pressures have pressed world well-known brands to make the move to sustainable packaging.

Companies are making the transition to sustainable packaging options; recognizing that the need for transparency across global supply chains and operations and manufacturing processes. The industry predicts that many companies will make the transition for social responsibility and to ensure brand loyalty. Companies are now prioritizing the integration of environmental practices.

To read the entire article please visit: http://www.fastcasual.com/articles/why-sustainable-packaging-is-a-must-have-for-restaurant-success/

Source: FastCasual

CDF’s Flexible Packaging Division Passes Food Safety Audit

CDF Corporation, a leading manufacturer of drum, pail, intermediate bulk container and bag in box liners and flexible packaging, has passed a food safety audit for one of North America’s largest consumer packaged food and beverage companies.

An auditor from Quality Assured Solutions was contracted to perform a food safety audit on CDF’s Flexible Packaging division. The food safety audit evaluates many aspects of compliance with respect to food safety, sanitary working conditions, employee training and the proper handling of food products and packaging. CDF’s Flexible Packaging division passed the food safety audit with a score of 88.1 out of 100. With this score, CDF has been approved to supply IBC liners to this highly regarded global food processor.

During the 16 hour audit the Flexible Packaging division showed that many food safety items were already in place, there is an active GMP program in place and there is a working copy of a HACCP plan. The audit was based on the customer’s supplier expectation manual. The manual is the standard and the supplier is assessed against the standard.

“We have been working on many of the GSFI requirements as we get closer to our ultimate goal of SQF Level 2 Certification in 2016. It was reassuring to have a well-respected third party auditor verify we are on the right track,” said Tom McCarthy, Flexible Packaging General Manager.

The auditing company, Quality Assured Solutions, offers world class consulting to the food, beverage and confectionary industries on a domestic and international scope.food

Jennifer McCracken sheds some light on the lure of green packaging

When it comes to sustainability, food and beverage brand owners are eager for new packaging material. While the desire for a green product line seems to be stronger than ever, brand owners still take into account the cost, product compatibility, shelf life, and regulatory requirements. How can companies take advantage of new sustainable packing lines? Jennifer McCracken, director, sustainability, Global Innovation and Sustainability at HAVI Global Solutions provided some insight while speaking at the New Material & Strategies to Cost-Efficiently Enhance Your Sustainability Plan this past July in Chicago.

McCracken points out that while people have the desire to make an impact, they often do not have the time or resources to do so. By packaging companies offering sustainable options, they are giving the consumer the ability to make ecological choices and thus have an impact on the environment. This is giving the consumer the power to make a difference through their purchasing. Brands also want their customers to feel a sense of pride when they purchase a particular product and thus allowing consumers to feel good about their purchases.

Recently, there has been an enormous lure to green packaging options; however, McCracken points out that that some manufacturers have reservations about the complete transition to sustainable materials. For packaging developers, the biggest concern is the cost and performance of the materials. McCracken explains that developers are looking for cost neutral and of equal quality so the packaging is effective.

Another reservation is whether the materials are truly sustainable. Are these materials using land resources? McCracken gives the example of growing trees to produce paper. Furthermore, newer materials may not have the certifications to call it sustainable, or newer sustainable materials may be relying on a third party to validate their materials.

When a company considers going sustainable, McCracken advises to carefully consider the message before making a significant investment. The message conveyed to the public needs to be legal, meet regulatory standards, and meet qualifying technical language while resonating with customers.

For more information on the green process, read Federal Trade Commission Green Guides for a better understanding.

For the full Jennifer McCracken article please visit http://www.packagingdigest.com/sustainable-packaging/why-are-sustainable-packaging-materials-in-such-high-demand1507

 

Source: Packaging Digest

TechNavio: Green Packaging Market to Jump Nearly 8% by 2019

The global green packaging market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 7.84 percent from 2014-2019, says research firm TechNavio.

Growth will come in large part from the growing demand from the food and beverage industry, the largest consumer of green packaging materials.

As demand for eco-friendly packaging materials increases, leading manufacturers of food and beverage products — including Cadbury, Coca-Cola, ConAgra Foods, Nestle and Pepsico — now use sustainable packaging materials that preserve food and its nutritional value. This gives them a competitive advantage over other market players, says Faisal Ghaus, VP of TechNavio.

To read the entire article, click here: http://www.packworld.com/sustainability/source-reduction/food-beverage-driving-global-green-packaging-market

Source: Packaging World

U.S., Europe follow different routes toward same goal of sustainability

Food and beverage packaging regulations for Europe and the United States have major differences. The European Union enforces stricter regulations that focus on reducing the packaging’s environmental impact and the waste disposal impact on human health, compared to the United States.

The European regulation REACH controls the use of chemicals in packaging and enforces restrictions on use of high risk chemicals, such as lead, hexavalent chromium, mercury and cadmium. This legislation also pushes companies to reduce the amount of packaging used in their products and to reduce the amount of waste their packaging produces. Materials must also be recyclable, incinerated with energy recovery or biodegradable.

Both the United States and European Commission imposes a total ban of bisphenol-A (BPA) on infant products. Studies have shown that the phthalates chemicals have been found to cause birth defects and reproductive malfunctions in humans. Globally, a ban on BPA and phthalates in food contract packaging is also being enforced by ISO regulations.

Click here to read the full article:

http://www.packagingdigest.com/article/522179-U_S_Europe_follow_different_routes_toward_same_goal_of_sustainability.php

Source: Packaging Digest

Consumers willing to pay more for sustainable packaging

According to a study conducted by Ipsos InnoQuest, consumers are likely to pay more for food and beverage packaging that has value added features related to freshness and sustainability. Results from the global survey show that 55% of participants would pay more for packaging that keeps food fresh longer and for environmental packaging. Participants in South Africa, Malaysia and India were willing to pay more for packaging that keeps food fresh longer. Participants from Mexico, South Africa and Indonesia would pay more for environmentally friendly packaging.

Packaging that prevents spills, keeps food and beverages at the right temperature and that makes it easier to eat or drink on the go ranked the lowest at 34%, 33% and 31%.

To access the report, click here:

http://www.foodbev.com/news/consumers-willing-to-pay-more-for-sustai

Source: FoodBev.com