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Flexible Packaging and Source Reduction

Is flexible packaging as sustainable as it claims to be? Yes flexible packaging is manufactured using less plastic than rigid packaging resulting in less plastic to transport and dispose of, but flexible packaging’s sustainability may not be as straightforward as perceived.

 

Flexible packaging advocates boast its sustainable advantages, which are mainly true, however if these claims are exaggerated they could result in serious backlash. Unfortunately the method for quantifying sustainability is subjective. Flexible packaging’s source reduction can be a competitive advantage. Although the more easily quantifiable benefits, such as storage and transport, might reside more with supply chains than with the consumer.

 

To win the consumer, companies should make true product sustainability claims. Companies should avoid overselling product sustainability claims and expect consumers to think of sustainability as a tie breaker when all other factors are equivalent.

 

Growth for flexible packaging could be attributed to the utilization of technologies to provide competitive advantages. Examples of this are innovations that allow for multilayer structures for better barrier protection, the ability to create an interlocking strip system to store product for long periods of time without exposure, and producing see-through packaging for product visibility.

 

To read the entire article please visit:

http://www.greenerpackage.com/source_reduction/flexible_packaging_and_source_reduction

 

Source: Greener Package

Five Key Trends Shaping Food and Beverage Packaging

Lifestyles and eating habits of the population today have drastically changed compared to prior years. Demographic changes, such as fewer married couples, more people living alone, smaller household sizes and multi-generational households are impacting packaging developments. The shift in consumer attitude and lifestyle has effected behaviors regarding food and beverage packaging. One of the five new trends includes targeting millennials who have shown more interest and brand loyalty to fresher and/or organic products that are typically found on the parameter of the grocery store. Second, smaller packages have proven a bigger trend. Smaller households or those living alone have more of a demand for smaller or single-serve packaged meals or multiple packaged snack packs. Third, convenient packaging has been a big selling point in snack foods. Ease of opening, reclosing, and portability have been an influence on the packaging. Fourth, transparent packaging. The ability to see ones food prior to buying has had huge influence on the food industry. The demand for more transparency in the food industry has been of grave importance to the consumer, both figuratively and literally. Lastly, eco-friendly packaging options have huge appeal to consumers as of late.

 

For further reading, please visit http://www.packworld.com/package-design/strategy/5-key-trends-shaping-food-and-beverage-packaging

 

Source: Packaging World

The Future is Flexible

Waste reduction, resource efficiency, sustainability and convenience: all reasons behind the growth in flexible packaging. Flexible packaging has entered a new era, one where more resources are saved, and food waste is reduced. Less efficient materials are being replaced, for example, the transportation of beverages in glass bottles versus pouch style. This meant that 47% of beverage was being transported while 52% was packaging. While pouches the ratio was 93% beverage and 6% pouch. The product still performs, sometimes more efficiently, and has a lower environmental impact. FPE is looking to reinforce the message that there is a more environmental sustainable alternative, and it is looking to make the whole supply chain more sustainable.

To read more, please visit:

http://www.packagingtoday.co.uk/features/featurethe-future-is-flexible-4302648/

Source: Packaging Today

Top five flexible packaging trends

According to Robert Hogan, the ITW Zip-Pak director of global business development, the top five flexible packaging trends are Japanese influence, market speed, convenience, private label power and cutting costs and materials. Japan is still the leader of high quality, innovative packaging.  Their focus on detail surpasses their Western counterparts. Consumers prefer packaging that is easy to use and convenient. Customer friendly features can be added to packaging in a short time frame with little disruption to the manufacturing process. Research shows that consumers are willing to pay more for easy to use, re-sealable packaging.

Link to read more: http://www.foodproductiondaily.com/Packaging/Flexible-packaging-emphasizes-convenience

Source: Food Production Daily

Growth and fragmentation in flexibles gives brands food for thought

Flexible packaging is finding new applications for consumers, currently pouches and other flexibles are involved in snacking from adults to toddlers. They are finding a wide range of products to target every consumer. Flexible packaging is offering unique shapes, functions, and convenience. Quite literally, this form of packaging is presenting its self as flexible for the needs of many industries. The flexible packaging industry is not pigeon holing either, the genius of the product is that it is flexible for those looking to convert, and those who are looking to be innovative and differentiate their product.

Between 2012 and 2013, the use of pouches for snacks grew 7%, the use of pouches for sauces and seasonings saw growth of 20%. Over the past decade, pouches have become quite the competition for traditional rigid packaging and has been embraced by U.S. consumers for the ease of use and accessibility. Going forward, we can count of seeing innovative designs, convenient uses, and easy storing.

To read the full article please visit: http://www.packagingdigest.com/flexible-packaging/growth-and-fragmentation-in-flexibles-gives-brands-food-for-thought140731

Source: Packaging Digest

Plastic is the sustainable packaging choice according to new study

According to a new study titled Impact of Plastics Packaging on Life Cycle Energy Consumption and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the United States and Canada by Franklin Associates for the American Chemistry Council and the Canadian Plastics Industry Association, six major categories of plastic packaging significantly reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions compared to packaging made with alternative materials. Using 2010 as a baseline year, the data shows replacing plastic packaging with alternative materials would result in 4.5 times more packaging weight, an 80% increase in energy use and 130% more global warming potential.

The study examines the six major packaging resins (low density polyethylene, high density PE, polypropylene, PVC, polystyrene, expanded PS, PET) against paper, glass, steel, aluminum, textiles, rubber and cork. The study considers the implications of the materials used in caps and closures, beverage containers, other rigid containers, shopping bags, shrink wrap, and other flexible packaging in a detailed life cycle assessment.

“The benefits hold up across a range of different kinds of applications and materials,” said Keith Christman, managing director of plastics markets for ACC. “Because plastics use so much less material in the first place it results in dramatic greenhouse gas reduction, and that’s just the start. It really adds up across the different types of packaging, to the equivalent of taking more than15 million cars off the road.”

Source: Plastics News

Packaging company Gualapack plans expansion

Italian flexible packaging company Gualapack is extending its international reach with plans to further grow its newly launched production plant in Latin America.

The company, already manufacturing through plants and partnerships in Europe, China, Japan and the US, expects to expand output at its facility in Costa Rica and increase the workforce fourfold from 30 to 160 by 2017.

It was in September last year that Castellazzo Bormida-based Gualapack formally opened its latest unit of 2,600 square metres in the Costa Rican capital San José. The group’s first plant in the region will turn out Gualapack’s full ‘Cheerpack DP’ spouted stand-up food and beverage pouch range.

Gualapack Costa Rica intends to penetrate Central and South America including Honduras, Venezuela, Brazil, Argentina and Chile.

The group, formed from the 2010 merger of two Italian flexpack suppliers Gualapack and Piacenza-based Safta, has three production units in Italy as well as joint ventures Secure Packaging in China, Cheer Pack North America and a partnership in Japan.

Child safe and child friendly ‘Cheerpack DP’ pouches are used for baby food, fruit purée, use its anti-choking ‘BabyCap’, and also have applications for dairy snacks, sauces, condiments and beverages, said Gualapack.

Apart from Italy, the firm operates a plant at Nadab in Romania which it established a little over two years ago.

Source: European Plastics News

Flexible packaging gains popularity among food and beverage makers

Globally, food companies are hoping on the flexible packaging bandwagon. Its convenience, high quality and light weight are three of the key reasons why national and private brands are choosing flexible packaging. Flexible packaging is ideal for a wide range of products, from cocktails to fruit chips.

Many companies are using packaging as a key brand differentiator. Bolthouse Farms designed a pouch that separates their carrots and seasoning. When consumers want to use the product, they pinch the pouch and pull to break the inner barrier that separates the two sections, then shake the pouch to season the carrots. By separating the carrots and seasoning both products are kept in optimal condition. Another example would be the British supermarket Tesco serving their heat and serve soups in stand up pouches. Tesco’s pouch is printed in high-definition flexography allowing consumers to see exactly what they are purchasing.

To read the article, click here:

http://www.processingmagazine.com/articles/125023-flexible-packaging-gains-popularity-among-food-and-beverage-makers

Source: Processing

The emergence of new pouches continues

After many years of discussion and projection, the rise of the pouch has taken over the grocery shelves and has replaced rigid lining for consumer products. In the past decade, we have seen the rise of pouches in consumer brands. The light weight, convenience, portability and shelf appeal has captured the appeal of the consumer, more so than any other packaging.

The pouch has had many new converters, including PepsiCo, H.J.Heinz, and Dial Corp, consumer brands are not the only converters, in recent years we have seen many startup and emerging companies taking over grocery shelves. New and emerging comrades include baby food, caffeine sticks, beverages, cosmetics, ketchup, seafood, wine, soap, water and many more. Some estimate that the annual growth in this market will reach double digits; this is far larger than any other packaging format.

To read more click here:

http://www.flexpackmag.com/Articles/Bag_Pouch_Making/BNP_GUID_9-5-2006_A_10000000000001178395

Bag-in-Box Smart Inventions

“An innovative, flexible packaging that flattens the competition” is the best way to describe CDF Corporation’s bag in box design. The Cheertainer bag in box is a gusseted, form-fit multi-ply bag that is marketed towards chemicals, cosmetics, food & beverage and medical markets. Although relatively new to manufacturing in the Plymouth area, the product goes back to 1995 in Asia, relates Product Manager Iris Thomas. The product is patented and owned by Japan’s Hosokawa Yoko Co.

The Cheertainer bag-in-box holds a wide range of markets, ranging from food & beverages to paints, inks and petroleum. So what is the big draw to Cheertainer? Iris Thomas feels the Cheertainer is a “real hit” because of the sustainability movement, she continues, “it’s a flexible bag, and a replacement to rigid packaging.” She continues, “The bags use less plastic, which translates into saving in warehouse space and transportation, which saves fuel and money,” she says, “they generally have lower cost performance because they’re better in fill and dispensing. It dispenses almost 100 percent of product,” she explains, “There’s not a lot of product trapped in the fold. It’s also safer than rigid packaging.”  In Plymouth, CDF is capable of manufacturing five million bags a year; however the plant is a long way from reaching capacity.

Further advantages to the Cheertainer include, replacing rigid packaging like cube-shaped inserts, cans and plastic pails, the Cheertainer is suitable for semi-automatic and fully automatic lines. The design of the Cheertainer is essentially a flat bag, this design minimizes shipping and warehouse space requirements, the flexibility, and shape minimizes dead space, this allows for more products per pallet. Using the consumer has benefits for using the Cheertainer, the bag fills without using air which eliminates splashing and foaming, the bag has superior seam strength and the fitment is always in the correct position, furthermore the lack of internal folds improves the filling and dispensing of the product- the dispensing if so accurate ranging around 99.9% dispensing of nearly any product.

There’s more to Cheer about!

In the CDF family is Cheer Pack, also deriving from Hosokawa in Asia, a stand up pouch with a cap, good for dispensing yogurts, ice creams and jellies. Cheer Packs President Steve Gosling, has supplied its Cheer Pack to Dole Foods Canada which distributes its five flavors of applesauce in the pouch.

Gosling states, “We produce 1.2 billion pouches a year with this fitting and ninety percent is for children’s products.” The pouches can now be found at seven national food stores, including Whole Foods and Babies R Us. Steve Gosling described the pouches as convenient because of their reclosable application, the no spill advantage and the shelf life of the product is stable for 24 months.

Made with multi-layer laminate material, with an outer layer of polyester which is capable of high-resolution graphic printing, a layer of aluminum foil for excellent barrier properties, another layer of polyester for shock and pressure resistance and lastly, internal layer of polyethylene for direct food contact.

The typical markets for Cheer Pack include energy drinks, beverages, yogurt, and sorbet. Other markets include cosmetics, gels, inks, shampoos, lotions and creams. One of the advantages of the pouches is the tamper-evident, screw on top to ensure safe usage.

To read more click here:

http://www.industrytoday.com/article_view.asp?ArticleID=2504