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5 sustainable packaging trends to watch in 2017

Companies have shifted their attention to packaging and are realizing the importance of sustainable packaging.

A lot of waste comes from disposing packaging, most of the waste ends up in landfills. Because of this, sustainable packaging has gained popularity. Companies are looking into ways to incorporate sustainable materials and practices in their packaging to create less of an impact on the planet.

Here are some of the sustainable packaging trends to look for in 2017

  1. Labeling will get clearer – Make it clear on the product packaging how to dispose of the packaging and clarify if there are sustainability claims. Clear labeling will also help your customers to be better informed. Being honest with customers will go a long way.
  2. Lightweight packaging will be embraced– Lightweight packaging has numerous benefits. Less material is needed to produce packages, manufacturing costs are lower, the environmental impact from transport is minimized and less waste is sent to landfills. The only negative is that when the recovery rates increase, it will remove the value from the recycling stream and undermine the economic incentive to recycle.
  3. Increased use of recyclable materials – The easiest way to ensure packaging has the least amount of impact is by using recyclable materials to manufacture the packaging.
  4. Edible packaging – Edible packaging eliminates packaging waste altogether; you would eat the packaging the product came in. Some of the challenges include: logistical problems like the risk of the packaging material being broken or consumer’s impressions that the packaging is unhygienic.
  5. Packages will slim down – The extra space within the package is creating additional material that needs to be disposed of. The goal is minimal packaging.

 

Full article: http://www.beveragedaily.com/Processing-Packaging/5-sustainable-packaging-trends-to-watch-in-2017

Source: Beverage Daily

World not starving for edible packaging?

Some companies have come up with brilliant solutions to the excessive packaging waste in the food industry, but the big question is whether customers are ready to make the mental shift to eating their food wrappers.

It doesn’t make sense that a single food item that gets consumed within minutes or even seconds should leave behind a piece of packaging that will linger on Earth for years. Think of a granola bar and its plastic wrapper, a mini yogurt container, a bag of chips, or a bottle of juice. These items, together with countless others, offer such fleeting satisfaction at a long-term cost, whether the destination is a landfill site or the convoluted, unreliable processes of a recycling facility.

Fortunately there is a growing number of conscientious shoppers who care about the amount of waste they generate, and who would choose not to buy the above-mentioned items precisely for the fact that packaging would go to waste following consumption. While these “Zero Wasters” make a big difference in their own lives, unfortunately their influence on the rest of society is limited.

That is where the packaging industry could step in and reinvent food packaging to be far more sustainable, perhaps even non-existent. According to an article in The Guardian, there are some really fascinating advances in the world of “waste-free, Willy Wonka packaging,” but the big question is whether consumers are psychologically ready for it. Buying apples and bagels directly from a bin at the supermarket is one thing, but sifting through a display of yogurt balls in edible skins is a different kind of experience.

Or is it? Shoppers are simply unaccustomed to seeing certain foods being sold without packaging, although they’re perfectly comfortable with other items, such as produce and baked goods, being sold loose. It’s time to get over that mental barrier.

The Guardian describes a company called WikiFoods that “wraps a vast range of foods and beverages in plastic-free and edible packages made of natural ingredients,” like the protective skins on fruits. The first commercial WikiPearls (little balls of ice cream and frozen yogurt with edible skins) launched in the U.S. and France in 2013.

Click here to read the article: http://www.packworld.com/world-not-starving-edible-packaging

Source: Packaging World