Top 5 packaging gifts of November 2016

Here are the top articles about sustainable packaging on PackagingDigest.com in 2016, based on page views:

 

5. Why are pouches becoming the go-to package format?

Have you noticed? It seems like brand owners are putting just about every type of product in flexible packages these days. TerraCycle CEO and regular Packaging Digest contributor Tom Szaky shares a few insights about why in his popular article The ‘pouch-ization’ of the world.

Is it because of better packaging performance? Consumer convenience? Environmental reasons? Yes, yes and yes.

But wait! There will be more because, as Szaky says, “Pouches continue to push enhanced functionality and convenience in excitingly fresh ways.”

 

4. Is the search for the Holy Grail of sustainable packaging over?

Sustainable guru Nina Goodrich believes we may have discovered the Holy Grail of sustainable packaging. As director of the Sustainable Packaging Coalition and executive director of GreenBlue, Goodrich knows a significant development when she sees it.

New recyclable barrier films and pouches using Dow’s Retain technology are a pretty big deal. But when you also combine that with up-and-coming high-pressure processing (HPP), food companies can do so much more than improve their environmental footprint.

“I believe that these two innovations combined (package and process) may lead to many new sustainable innovations,” Goodrich enthuses. “This is a huge step towards the circular economy for flexible packaging and a significant opportunity to reduce food waste.”

 

3. Riding the wave of sustainable packaging

With the new year less than one month old, TerraCycle CEO and regular Packaging Digest contributor Tom Szaky (yep, same author of the No.5 article—he’s on a roll) outlined 4 sustainable packaging drivers in 2016 and many of you jumped all over these hot trends.

Szaky explains why he thought clearer labeling, an appeal to the conscious consumer, a boom in bioplastics and the continuation of lightweight packaging would command your attention this year.

With 2017 looming and new trends to be identified, how do you think Szaky did in calling out the 2016 sustainable packaging trends?

 

Click here to read the top 2 packaging gifts: http://www.packagingdigest.com/sustainable-packaging/top-5-sustainable-packaging-trends-and-news-of-2016-2016-11-30/page/0/2

Source: Packaging Digest

Europe to lead green packaging market; bioplastics to flourish

Per Allied Market Research, the recycle content packaging segment is expected to grow with a CAGR of 4.92 percent to reach $207,543 million globally by 2022.

Bioplastic is a new ecological alternative to oil-based polymers with promising growth in pharmaceutical sectors. Bioplastics have flourished in healthcare and pharmaceutical markets and are accepted as an alternative for polymer oil-based products. Reverse logistics and an increase in the number of legislations for ecological packaging techniques have facilitated the recycle of municipal wastes.

The European region is expected to continue to lead the green packaging market, followed by North America. The German green packaging market is estimated at a CAGR of 5.10 percent, while the Middle East region is estimated to grow at a CAGR of 3.15 percent. The North American and Asia-Pacific regions jointly accounted for more than half of the total 2015 share.

Rise in hygiene and health concerns among consumers boosts the demand for green packaging with applications in sustainable packaging.

 

To read the full article, click here: http://www.greentechlead.com/waste-management/europe-lead-green-packaging-market-bioplastics-flourish-31738

Source: Greentechlead

 

Who’s responsible for making plastic packaging more recyclable?

In the ongoing discussion about whether manufacturers, material recovery facilities (MRFs) or recyclers should be responsible for the sustainability of plastic packaging, the answer still seems to be all of the above.

MRFs have always had to keep up with an evolving waste stream by adapting to the various shapes and sizes of consumer packaging that end up on their tipping floors. When it comes to plastic packaging — some of which has become lighter and more complex — players from all sides of the supply chain have their own ideas about how to best manage it. The work of reconciling these opinions, while keeping consumer communication as simple as possible, looks to be even more visible in the year ahead.

“We continue to see more and more products in the marketplace that in fact are difficult, if not impossible, to recycle so they become a contaminant in the recycling stream,” said Steve Alexander, executive director of the Association of Plastic Recyclers (APR).

APR doesn’t believe that brands intentionally design products with inherent recycling challenges, but says it still happens too often. Alexander said that by releasing an updated design guide last year, APR hopes to become more involved in the “embryonic” stage rather than having to find solutions after the fact. He compared retrofitting a package to renovating a house rather than building features in from the start — unintended consequences are sure to come up along the way.

One of the more common examples of this type of retrofitting is what has happened with full bottle or shrink sleeve labels. The labels had been sinking in the plastic recycling process and in many cases this was creating sediment and contaminating material during washing.

Research and engineering company Plastics Forming Enterprise consults with APR, brands and recyclers to sort out the finer details of their packaging challenges through testing. Kristina Hansen, their technical director, has worked on a wide range of adhesives, labels, additives and fillers, and the factors involved in these areas vary. Many of them come back to the need for a cleaner material stream to ensure that recyclers can offer a better product and manufacturers can have higher percentages of post-consumer recycled (PCR) content in their packaging.

 

Full article: http://www.wastedive.com/news/whos-responsible-for-making-plastic-packaging-more-recyclable/433851/

Source: Waste Dive