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The USDA Is Working On A New Type Of Sustainable Food Packaging

USDA researchers have devised a different way to package things like meat, bread, and cheese. Instead of using plastic, they’ve developed an edible, biodegradable packaging film made of casein, a milk protein, that can be wrapped around food to prevent spoilage.

The United States produces a lot of milk, but milk consumption has been on the decline for years. So the USDA has been working to find a way to take that excess milk, usually stored in powder form, and create something usable with it. Even though the USDA has been working to create food packaging with milk products for decades; it’s only in the last few years that researchers cracked the code for making casein-based films competitive with plastic-films.

The biggest problem researchers faced with casein-based films is that casein is extremely sensitive to water . This is a serious problem for a product that is supposed to keep food sealed and dry. Adding pectin to the casein mixture created a film that, while still more sensitive to moisture than plastic, did not immediately dissolve in water or areas with humidity. The casein-based film was actually 250 times more effective at blocking oxygen than plastic. That keeps food from oxidizing and going stale, and also slows down the growth of bacteria.

There are still some issues associated with the casein-based packaging. Due to it being moisture sensitive  and because it is edible, the packaging cannot be used alone on store shelves, yet. In order to keep the packaging both stale and sanitary, the packaging would need to be used in conjunction with a secondary layer of packaging. The casein-film could be used to make single-serving packaging for items like a soup or coffee, that, when dropped into hot water, would dissolve completely.

The casein-based film could be sprayed directly onto food, or directly onto packaging, to create a moisture resistant barrier or add nutrients. With the right industry partners, consumers could see this packaging on the shelves in as little as a year.

To read the full article, click here:
https://thinkprogress.org/usda-edible-food-packaging-9caa16d7d4fd#.mikofvkay

Source: Think Progress

Responsible food packaging could connect consumers to the environment

Research reveals that 80% U.S. food shoppers agree that reducing food waste is as important as reducing packaging waste. According to Mintel’s 2016 US Food Packaging Report 52% of consumers indicate they would prefer to buy foods with minimal or even no packaging to reduce waste.

81% of consumers say they would choose resealable packaging over non-resealable packaging to extend the shelf life of food. 54% would pay more for packaging with added features, such as being resealable or portion controlled. 30% indicated they often reuse food packaging for other purposes. However, recycling of food packaging is far from a universal behavior, as only 42% consumers report recycling most of the food packaging they use.

A lack of clear communication on labels may be a contributor to the relatively low recycling rate, 25% of consumers said it’s not always clear which food packaging is recyclable. Only 13% of consumers make an effort to avoid foods in packaging that cannot be recycled.

“Our research shows that reducing food waste is top of mind for consumers,” says John Owen, senior food and drink analyst at Mintel. “This presents opportunities for food brands and retailers to address these concerns through innovative packaging and product messaging.”

However, in 2015, only 21% of food product launches in the U.S. included on package claims regarding environmentally friendly packaging.

“The prevention of food waste can be positioned not only as a good way for consumers to save money, but also as a way to work toward reversing the growing food waste trend through conscious consumption,” says Owen.

Click here to read the article:
http://www.packagingdigest.com/food-packaging/responsible-food-packaging-could-connect-consumers-to-the-environment-2016-09-01

Source: Packaging Digest

CDF Corporation exhibiting IBC and Bag-in-Box at the IDFA Ice Cream Technology Conference

CDF Corporation, a global company that specializes in the manufacture and sale of high quality pail, drum, intermediate bulk container and bag in box liners and flexible packaging, will display an IBC tote liner and bag-in-box at booth# 5 at the International Dairy Foods Association Ice Cream Technology Conference.

 

The International Dairy Foods Association Ice Cream Technology Conference will be held April 12th through the 13th at the Hyatt Coconut Point Resort & Spa in Bonita Springs, Florida. This event is for ice cream and frozen dessert professionals. The Ice Cream Technology Conference focuses specifically on frozen dessert research, technology, new market trends, food safety, labeling and opportunities.

 

CDF offers a wide range of flexible products that satisfy ice cream manufacturers’ needs. Form-fit IBC (cube-shaped) liners provide high performance in critical applications, such as top-fill applications using a bridge or automated filler; containers with no access doors for placing a liner at the bottom; high speed fills and viscous products that would get caught in the folds of pillow-shaped liners.

 

Air-Assist® liners are specially designed for convenient dispense and improved evacuation of high viscosity products. The Air-Assist liner features a Form-fit liner with an attached air bladder. As the air bladder is inflated, it pushes against the Form-fit liner, forcing the viscous product out of the bottom dispense fitment, resulting in less residual product left in the liner.

 

Bag-in-box will also be on display. Bag-in-box is the ideal packaging solution for food applications ranging in size from 1 liter to 25 liters. CDF offers both form-fit and pillow styles to meet all your bag in box needs.

 

Representing CDF will be Leigh Vaughn, Regional Manager. Leigh has 25 years of sales management experience in the flexible packaging industry. Combining a deep understanding of packaging, industrial applications and direct customer relationships allows Leigh to offer a consultative approach in these areas.