Study finds more plastic packaging could mean less waste

Europe is facing a food waste issue. According to a European Commissioned study, in 2012 more than 100 million metric tons of food was wasted in the EU. Due to the results, the Commission released a policy paper to all EU members to develop a plan to prevent food waste. While plastic manufacturers and their customers in the EU are under constant pressure to reduce the volume of plastic used, plastic may be the answer to reducing the amount of food waste. A study conducted shows that plastic prevents damage and contamination to foods; providing a barrier against moisture and oxygen this translates into a longer shelf life. The study was authored by Harald Pilz, who suggests that packaging technologies are in continuous development to better optimize barrier layers and puncture resistance.

 

Included in the study were six test foods: sirloin steak, Austria’s Bergbaron cheese, a yeast bun, garden lettuce, a cucumber and chicken. These foods were enclosed in the usual packaging. The study compared the rates of spoiling with these foods when using new plastic packaging. Though the new packaging used more plastic, it reduced the occurrence of food waste by fifty percent.

 

To read the entire article, please visit http://www.plasticsnews.com/article/20151005/NEWS/310069999/more-plastic-packaging-can-mean-less-waste-say-experts

 

Source: Plastics News

CDF’s Bag-in-Box receives UN Certification for 20 Liter Bag-In-Box Packaging

CDF Corporation, a leading manufacturer of drum, pail, intermediate bulk container and bag in box liners and flexible packaging, has successfully passed the design qualification testing of a combination package; fiberboard box with a plastic bag. CDF’s UN certified bag-in-box will provide the highest levels of protection for transporting hazardous products requiring class II and III packaging.

 

The 20 liter bag-in-box packaging endured four rigorous performance tests executed by Ten-E Packaging Services; the tests include drop, stacking, vibration and cobb water absorption. Prior to testing, the packages were prepared exactly as they would be for transportation and in accordance to UN testing guidelines. TEN-E used an alternate solution in place of the hazardous material, as allowed by the UN testing regulations.

 

“Our development team did a tremendous job creating a product that meets the rigorous UN standards while offering unique value to our customers.  We are excited to continue our growth into the UN package market segment,” said Jay Waltz, CDF Vice President of Sales & Marketing.

 

For the box drop tests, each package was dropped from 47.2”. The first drop was flat on the bottom, the second drop was flat on the top, the third drop was flat on the long side, the fourth drop was flat on the short side and the fifth drop was on a corner. Any breakage or leaking during the tests void the package. One prepared package was dropped for each test. CDF’s bag-in-box package passed the drop tests at 1.2m.

 

The stacking test is performed to ensure the packages are strong enough that they will not collapse. For the stacking tests, two filled packages of the same type are placed on the test sample. The stacked packages must maintain their position for one hour. CDF’s bag-in-box package passed the stacking test at 303.9Kg – 24 hours.

 

The vibration tests are done to simulate the package traveling by motorized vehicle. For this test, the packages are placed upright on a vibration platform. The packages are constrained horizontally to prevent falling off the table, but can move vertically to bounce and rotate. Immediately following the period of vibration, each package is removed from the platform, turned on its side and observed for evidence of leakage. CDF’s bag-in-box package passed the vibration test at 4.1Hz – 1 hour.

 

The cobb water absorption test is performed on the fiberboard outer package to test the quantity of water that can be absorbed by the surface of paper or board in a given time. This is to ensure the paper used is of high enough quality and that it will not disintegrate with moisture. CDF’s box passed the cobb water absorption test at 30 minutes.

Flexible Packaging and Source Reduction

Is flexible packaging as sustainable as it claims to be? Yes flexible packaging is manufactured using less plastic than rigid packaging resulting in less plastic to transport and dispose of, but flexible packaging’s sustainability may not be as straightforward as perceived.

 

Flexible packaging advocates boast its sustainable advantages, which are mainly true, however if these claims are exaggerated they could result in serious backlash. Unfortunately the method for quantifying sustainability is subjective. Flexible packaging’s source reduction can be a competitive advantage. Although the more easily quantifiable benefits, such as storage and transport, might reside more with supply chains than with the consumer.

 

To win the consumer, companies should make true product sustainability claims. Companies should avoid overselling product sustainability claims and expect consumers to think of sustainability as a tie breaker when all other factors are equivalent.

 

Growth for flexible packaging could be attributed to the utilization of technologies to provide competitive advantages. Examples of this are innovations that allow for multilayer structures for better barrier protection, the ability to create an interlocking strip system to store product for long periods of time without exposure, and producing see-through packaging for product visibility.

 

To read the entire article please visit:

http://www.greenerpackage.com/source_reduction/flexible_packaging_and_source_reduction

 

Source: Greener Package