New Research aims to recover more flexible packaging

Resource Recycling systems, out of Ann Arbor, MI has focused their efforts on new research aimed at improving the material recovery technology. The research will look into a more efficient way to recover flexible packaging, including reseable food packages, pouches for soup, crackers and tuna, pet food bags, and snack bags for recycling. Resource Recycling Solutions has developed the test methodology that will run various flexible packaging in single stream recycling through existing sorting technologies then measure the amount captured to determine the effectiveness of the technology. This sorting technology is critical when uncovering the flexible packaging loop, what happens in the MRF that is not picking up on various kinds of packaging? This research aims to discover the answer to that question through the use of optical scanners and screens that will capture that data.

 

Material recovery is a hot topic in flexible packaging and many companies have come together to create an alliance called Materials Recovery for the Future. This new alliance trade group includes companies, manufacturers, trade groups, and packaging industry professionals. All with the common goal of collecting data from the research that will help learn how to recover and divert more valuable resins from landfills.

 

For further reading, please visit http://www.wastedive.com/news/new-research-aims-to-recover-more-flexible-packaging/405740/

 

Source: Waste Dive

Consumer Trends Changing the World of Packaging

Over the past five years, consumers have become more aware and educated on environmental issues and taking health and wellness more seriously. With a more educated consumer base, manufacturers and food companies need to be more upfront and honest about packaging claims they make. Companies will be held to a higher standard with harsher consequences if they over-extend their packaging claims. Today, the largest complaint being made about packaging is the excessive packaging being used to protect product. Consumers also care whether the packaging being used can be recycled. Companies are taking note, more companies are labelling their environmental affects outside the ingredient list. While the sustainability issue continues to grow, plastic is still the more popular packaging material at 29% of the packaging market. Flexible packaging has seen an increase in the beverage world, as well as the baking and snack industry.

 

For further reading, please visit: http://www.bakeryandsnacks.com/R-D/Consumer-trends-changing-the-world-of-packaging

 

Source: Bakery & Snacks

Are refill stations the answer to packaging waste?

Currently retail packaging for cleaning chemicals, personal care products and beverages is single use, however that is changing. With a goal of eliminating waste, eco-conscious companies are setting up in store refill stations to reuse containers. The motto for The Refill Place, stores that offer refills for personal care products, laundry detergent and cleaning chemicals, is “Refill, Not Landfill.”  The Common Good company offers customers refill options for their hand soap, dish soap, all-purpose cleaner and laundry detergent. While it may be challenging to reduce the amount of waste produced by single use packaging, companies offering refill options can make a significant difference in reducing packaging waste.

 

http://www.packagingdigest.com/sustainable-packaging/are-refill-stations-the-answer-to-packaging-waste150401

 

Source: Packaging Digest