Boundless Potential for Cosmetics Packaging

Sustainability has become an integral part of the beauty business – environmentally intelligent packaging designs are attracting more consumers, satisfy current customers, and create an ethical mission for the company.

A new perspective on a familiar concept: this is the revolution of compostable packaging is providing says design expert, Leslie Sherr, co-author of the latest book series from Material ConneXion. By incorporating compostable bioplastics based on mycelium, or mushrooms, or technotraf wood packaging from that derives from sustainable forests manufacturers and design experts can open up many possibilities. Sherr adds that how materials are treated and applied is where the potential exists; furthermore, working with the same material in a new way holds immense potential.

There is no limit to sustainable packaging, and a good place to start is the Sustainable Packaging Coalition, states Sherr. They have a large database that have an extensive list of consumer brands and they understand design innovation.

To read more from Leslie Sherr, please visit http://www.cosmeticsdesign.com/Packaging-Design/Cosmetics-and-Personal-Care-Packaging-sustainable-materials

Source: Cosmetics Design

Interest in bio-materials & boosting compostable packaging

The new trend in packaging materials continued to be influenced by sustainable strategies and goals. However, the topic of compostable packaging continues to be dismissed before actually being considered. Susanna Carson, president, BSI Biodegradable Solution spoke at this past SustPack 2015 in Orlando, Florida. She discussed a case study on one brand owner who brought stakeholders together to create an environmental solution to packaging needs.

In her discussion, “Certification vs. Collaboration: Securing End of Life Options for Compostable Packaging” she touched upon the highest level of interested for environmental friendly packaging is from consumers. The more consumers become interested and educated on the end of life impact of packaging waste in our oceans and landfills the more they are tired of convenient packaging that inevitably sits for thousands of years. Compostable packaging is being driven by consumers and adopted by companies that are listening to what people want. While the interested and demand is high, the use of compostable packaging is low. Companies are still working out pricing, operational issues, facility acceptance, and material performance. Carson emphasized that no one wants to fail and that developments take time.

Compostable packaging is the result of incredible advancements in technology. Plant-based, and bio based polymers perform on par with conventional petroleum-based materials, except that certified compostable packaging will not spend the end of life in landfills and oceans. The similarity is striking; however, it can make it hard for facilities to differentiate between the three types of packaging which can result in facilities rejecting material because it may cause contaminants in their healthy compost.

For further reading on Susanna Carson’s case study and for the full article, please visit http://www.packagingdigest.com/sustainable-packaging/will-interest-in-bio-materials-boost-compostable-packaging-in-the-us150324

 

Source: Packaging Digest

Jennifer McCracken sheds some light on the lure of green packaging

When it comes to sustainability, food and beverage brand owners are eager for new packaging material. While the desire for a green product line seems to be stronger than ever, brand owners still take into account the cost, product compatibility, shelf life, and regulatory requirements. How can companies take advantage of new sustainable packing lines? Jennifer McCracken, director, sustainability, Global Innovation and Sustainability at HAVI Global Solutions provided some insight while speaking at the New Material & Strategies to Cost-Efficiently Enhance Your Sustainability Plan this past July in Chicago.

McCracken points out that while people have the desire to make an impact, they often do not have the time or resources to do so. By packaging companies offering sustainable options, they are giving the consumer the ability to make ecological choices and thus have an impact on the environment. This is giving the consumer the power to make a difference through their purchasing. Brands also want their customers to feel a sense of pride when they purchase a particular product and thus allowing consumers to feel good about their purchases.

Recently, there has been an enormous lure to green packaging options; however, McCracken points out that that some manufacturers have reservations about the complete transition to sustainable materials. For packaging developers, the biggest concern is the cost and performance of the materials. McCracken explains that developers are looking for cost neutral and of equal quality so the packaging is effective.

Another reservation is whether the materials are truly sustainable. Are these materials using land resources? McCracken gives the example of growing trees to produce paper. Furthermore, newer materials may not have the certifications to call it sustainable, or newer sustainable materials may be relying on a third party to validate their materials.

When a company considers going sustainable, McCracken advises to carefully consider the message before making a significant investment. The message conveyed to the public needs to be legal, meet regulatory standards, and meet qualifying technical language while resonating with customers.

For more information on the green process, read Federal Trade Commission Green Guides for a better understanding.

For the full Jennifer McCracken article please visit http://www.packagingdigest.com/sustainable-packaging/why-are-sustainable-packaging-materials-in-such-high-demand1507

 

Source: Packaging Digest