Products for Intermediate Bulk Containers – Air-Assist Liner

Air-Assist Liner Set-Up & Dispense

Air-Assist liners are specially designed for convenient dispense and improved evacuation of high viscosity products. The Air-Assist liner features a Form-fit liner with an attached air bladder. As the air bladder is inflated, it pushes against the Form-fit liner, forcing the viscous product out of the bottom dispense fitment, resulting in less residual product left in the liner. In addition, the Air-Assist liner is hands-free; after attaching the air supply system, the operator can walk away during dispense.

‘100% Zero Waste’ Achieved using NatureFlex™ Packaging

Innovia Films has announced that Oregon-based ECOTEAS is usingNatureFlex packaging films in the wrappers of its individual tea bags. The flexible packaging material is derived from wood pulp sourced from managed plantations and is certified to be over 90 percent bio-based and home and industrial compostable. High barriers to oxygen and moisture work to ensure the tea bags contained within are protected and kept fresh. When laminated to paper, the final structure offers the protection and natural appearance that ECOTEAS was looking for.

ECOTEAS received the Sustainable Food Trade Association’s national “Responsible Packaging Award” in 2012 for the use of 100 percent post-consumer recycled paperboard in its cartons. This recognition led to continued development of the “greenest” tea packaging possible. To extend its sustainability efforts to the entire tea bag line, the brand removed the tags, strings and staples, and introduced the new tea bag overwraps. The result was a 100 percent zero-waste package, with all ingredients and packaging components suitable for composting (tea, filter paper and wrapper) or recycling (carton), according to the brand.

Click here to read the full article: http://www.packagingeurope.com/Packaging-Europe-News/62712/100-Zero-Waste-Achieved-using-NatureFlex-Packaging.html

Source: Packaging Europe

World not starving for edible packaging?

Some companies have come up with brilliant solutions to the excessive packaging waste in the food industry, but the big question is whether customers are ready to make the mental shift to eating their food wrappers.

It doesn’t make sense that a single food item that gets consumed within minutes or even seconds should leave behind a piece of packaging that will linger on Earth for years. Think of a granola bar and its plastic wrapper, a mini yogurt container, a bag of chips, or a bottle of juice. These items, together with countless others, offer such fleeting satisfaction at a long-term cost, whether the destination is a landfill site or the convoluted, unreliable processes of a recycling facility.

Fortunately there is a growing number of conscientious shoppers who care about the amount of waste they generate, and who would choose not to buy the above-mentioned items precisely for the fact that packaging would go to waste following consumption. While these “Zero Wasters” make a big difference in their own lives, unfortunately their influence on the rest of society is limited.

That is where the packaging industry could step in and reinvent food packaging to be far more sustainable, perhaps even non-existent. According to an article in The Guardian, there are some really fascinating advances in the world of “waste-free, Willy Wonka packaging,” but the big question is whether consumers are psychologically ready for it. Buying apples and bagels directly from a bin at the supermarket is one thing, but sifting through a display of yogurt balls in edible skins is a different kind of experience.

Or is it? Shoppers are simply unaccustomed to seeing certain foods being sold without packaging, although they’re perfectly comfortable with other items, such as produce and baked goods, being sold loose. It’s time to get over that mental barrier.

The Guardian describes a company called WikiFoods that “wraps a vast range of foods and beverages in plastic-free and edible packages made of natural ingredients,” like the protective skins on fruits. The first commercial WikiPearls (little balls of ice cream and frozen yogurt with edible skins) launched in the U.S. and France in 2013.

Click here to read the article: http://www.packworld.com/world-not-starving-edible-packaging

Source: Packaging World