Study points to packaging as a solution to food waste in supply chain

Australia study conducted by RMIT University’s Centre for Design uncovers where and why food waste occurs within the supply chain and suggests packaging technologies that may help reduce this waste. “Packaging actually plays a critical role in protecting fresh produce and processed food in transit, in storage, at point of sale, and prior to consumption. In doing so, it helps deliver a wide range of functions while reducing food waste,” says RMIT Senior Research Fellow Dr. Karli Verghese leader of the research study.

While households are the largest generator of food waste to landfill (2.7 million tons each year), the report shows that in the commercial and industrial sector, the largest generators are food services (661,000 tones), followed by food manufacturing (312,000 tones), retailing (179,000 tones), and wholesale distribution (83,000 tones). However, food waste recovery rates are extremely high in the manufacturing sector, with 90% of waste repurposed.

“There are certainly opportunities to minimize food waste through packaging innovation and design, such as improved ventilation and temperature control for fresh produce, and better understanding the dynamics between different levels of packaging, to ensure they are designed fit-for-purpose.”

To read the entire article, click the link below

http://www.packworld.com/sustainability/waste-reduction/study-points-packaging-solution-food-waste-supply-chain

Source: Packaging World

How Logistics is Transforming Sustainability

Sustainable packaging has become a major concern because of excessive packaging. Excessive packaging affects the environment because it uses extra container board and polystyrene, which results in more carbon emissions needed to manufacture the materials. A larger-than-needed package also results in fewer packages that can be transported, thus burning more fuel. In contrast, using too little packaging is also not a solution because a damaged product would prompt the business to send a replacement item to the customer and nullify any environmental benefit of the package. The solution is to find the optimum pack design. Your logistics provider may have a package lab that can assist you in designing packaging optimally.

To read the entire article, click the link below

http://www.packagingeurope.com/Packaging-Europe-News/54265/How-Logistics-is-Transforming-Sustainability.html

Source: Packaging Europe

Hot Topics in Flexible Packaging

As demand grows worldwide for food and pharmaceuticals safety and sustainability are the hot topics, particularly in Europe where the legislative impact on the industry is growing. Packaging is critical for protection and preservation and is becoming more sophisticated and tailored to the market requirements.

At the same time there is a raised awareness of other issues like sustainability in the supply chain and the critical factor of safety in food contact, which is studied in terms of levels of extractables and leachables in European standards.

The better the barrier the longer the shelf-life will be for perishable foodstuffs. BASF has recently announced an increase in production of polyamide for packaging, which is a very high barrier material, while Reliance in India has studied nanocomposites for this purpose, and Nippon Gohsei has brought a biodegradable gas barrier polymer to the market. The adhesive interlayer is critical to holding the film structure together and companies such as Yparex are supplying these materials.

To read the entire article, click the link below

http://www.packagingeurope.com/Packaging-Europe-News/53726/Hot-Topics-in-Flexible-Packaging.html

Source: Packaging Europe